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Out Of State DWI In New Jersey

According to the International Bridge, Tunnel and Turnpike Association, the New Jersey Turnpike is America’s fifth longest tollroad, but the third highest earning, with $952 million in annual revenue. In 2010 alone, the Turnpike served almost 237 million drivers, many of whom came from Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware, Connecticut and, of course, New York.

If you are an out-of-state driver convicted of a DWI or DUI charge in New Jersey, you will not be able to drive in the state of New Jersey for the applicable suspension time period.

How Will My Home State Treat A DWI Conviction?

Furthermore, out-of-state drivers should be aware that New Jersey will report the matter to their state of residence. After your home state learns of the conviction, they will most likely suspend your driver’s license, too. The duration of this suspension will equal the one you would have received, had the conviction occurred in your home state.

Most states comply with the “Drivers License Compact,” an agreement that stipulates if a driver receives a ticket in a state other than the one where they are licensed, the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) will report the ticket to the driver’s home state. The purpose is to make drivers accountable in their home states where they will receive points on their driving record and insurance surcharges. They will also incur a license suspension in both the state they were convicted in, as well as their home state.

Because New Jersey has agreed to become a member of the above-mentioned compact, an out-of-state driver convicted of DWI or any other traffic violation in New Jersey will be reported to their home state.

Five states have refused to become members of the Drivers License Compact: Georgia, Massachusetts, Michigan, Tennessee, and Wisconsin. Although Georgia, Michigan, and Wisconsin are not members of the Compact, they still inform the “home state” when a driver receives a traffic ticket in their state.

Drivers From Pennsylvania

If you have no prior convictions for DUI or DWI on your PA license, you will not lose your driving privileges at home. Even so, there are clear reasons to investigate and consider challenging the DWI you received in New Jersey.

If you have a prior conviction on your PA driver’s license, you will be suspended in PA for at least one year.

To learn more, visit our “Pennsylvania Driver DWI In New Jersey” page here.

Drivers From Delaware

Delaware licensed motorists convicted of a DWI charge in New Jersey will lose their New Jersey driving privileges for three months to one year on a first conviction.  In addition, you will lose your driving privileges in Delaware for 12 months.

The home state suspension will ordinarily begin one month to four months after being convicted. The clock starts ticking on the 12 month suspension once the driver acknowledges the notice of suspension.

Should I Plead Guilty?

As a result of the harsh penalties described above, there is little incentive for Delaware drivers to just plead guilty. This holds true for drivers from Pennsylvania who have previous DUI convictions, as well. It is critical to determine whether you can win the DWI / DUI charge.

Contact Levow DWI Law to determine how to reduce the possibility of being found guilty of DWI and how to fight this charge. In the event that the charge is “refusal,” we’ve had success in helping clients retain their home state driving privileges.  Please call us today for a free consultation.

What About Other States?

If you were convicted of a DWI in New Jersey, Colorado, Ohio, and Wisconsin will not add points to your driver’s record. In Colorado, out-of-state traffic tickets for infractions like speeding will not be added to your record. However, an out-of-state DUI conviction will definitely be added to your record.

New York has similar laws as Colorado. However, if the tickets or convictions were received in Quebec or Ontario, Canada, points for traffic violations will be added to the New York driver’s record.

Georgia and Michigan will add points to the motorist’s driving record for out-of-state violations.

Kentucky does not add points for speeding tickets from other states, but does add points for other violations.

Vermont and North Carolina will only report an infraction to another state if it results in license suspension.

In North Carolina, if the violation is cause for license suspension, the state will assess points for out-of-state tickets.

In order for a speeding ticket to be placed on a driver’s record in Arizona, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, South Dakota, and Wyoming, the motorist must have been traveling at least 10 miles per hour over the speed limit. If the same ticket is issued to an out-of-state driver in any of these states, the ticket may be reported to the home state and points assessed.

South Dakota does not add points for speeding violations.

What About the Non-Resident Violator Compact?

The Non-Resident Violator Compact (NRVC) is used by 44 states to process traffic violations across state borders.

When an out-of-state motorist incurs a driving infraction in a member state but does not acknowledge or pay the ticket, the driver’s home state will suspend the driver’s license. Certain infractions do not apply, including parking violations or expired inspection stickers.

You can learn more from the American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators.

Disclaimer: The accuracy of the information contained in this document is not guaranteed. Contact local authorities for verification.